Varley
Art Gallery
Courtyard

Rise

Nathalie Bertin

Métis, French and Algonquin

The image is of a bear standing with its nose towards the sky. The background is a contemporary version of a Metis sash. The bear represents courage. The red is often associated with the colour of blood that was shed by Metis peoples who had the courage to stand up for themselves in order to remain free. The bear also symbolises courage in the Seven Sacred Teachings. This teaching asks us to have the courage to fight when it is needed but also to know when it’s best to walk away. Fighting can also mean simply doing what you need to reach your highest potential.

Nathalie Bertin currently lives near the shores of Lake Nosbonsing, east of North Bay, Ontario.

After taking courses in animation, film and new media, Nathalie worked as a graphic designer in printing, publishing and advertising for over 20 years. She then obtained a B.A. in Adult Education with distinction before deciding to pursue her true passion, the arts, in 2009. However, not content with just one medium, she delves into painting, illustration, photography and a variety of traditional crafts. 

Nathalie has had ten of her illustrations featured on Royal Canadian Mint collector coins. She has illustrated several children’s books published by Nelson Education. She has also self-published her first book of traditional stories with images of her beaded cushions. 

She is the co-creator of Breathe: “a collection of traditional masks demonstrating resilience in the face of the 21st century pandemic”. Nathalie Bertin’s work can be found in collections of the Government of Canada, the provinces of Manitoba and Alberta, the Royal Ontario Museum, and private collectors in Canada, the United States, and Europe. Nathalie’s work and artistic practice have also been featured on CBC/Radio-Canada and TFO.

“The capacity to imagine gives us hope. It can push us to further our potential. Just as our spirit names are meant to identify us, they are also a means to reflect on our true inner beings. The stories we are given in a naming ceremony are often imaginative but in a way that will allow us to delve more deeply into our true essence so that we may fulfill our potential in the truest sense of who we are as human beings. To me, the Year to Imagine ignites this reflection on what we want the future to be, it opens us up to the possibilities we can move forward to lay the foundation for our best future.”

LunarFest GTA is grateful to be held on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of many nations, including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat peoples, that is now home to many diverse First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. We acknowledge our privilege to be gathered on this land, and commit to work with and be respectful to the Indigenous peoples whose arts and stories inspire us to bring communities together.

Stay up to date on our cultural events

LunarFest GTA is grateful to be held on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of many nations, including the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat peoples, that is now home to many diverse First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. We acknowledge our privilege to be gathered on this land, and commit to work with and be respectful to the Indigenous peoples whose arts and stories inspire us to bring communities together.

For sponsorship, partnership, performance or volunteer opportunity, please contact us here.

Talk To Us & We’ll Talk To You!